Pandemic Preparedness and Response: A Virtual Course

An Equity-Based Approach to Pandemic Preparedness and Response: Emerging Insights from COVID-19 Global Response Leaders

July 7, 9, 14, and 16 | 10am – 11:30am EDT / 4pm – 5:30pm CAT

Free Registration

Jointly offered by Partners In Health and the University of Global Health Equity, this course presents a practical orientation to pandemic preparedness and response by public and global health leaders, implementers, and policymakers. This is a unique opportunity to learn from experts leading national and global efforts to address COVID-19 and other pandemics.

Course Overview

Case studies on the response to COVID-19 in the U.S (Massachusetts and Navajo Nation), and in Rwanda will be analyzed to illustrate principles and frameworks for the design of effective interventions to emerging pandemics. Overall, the course will train participants to analyze and to explain challenges of pandemic preparedness and response through a practical, interdisciplinary and equity-driven approach.

Participants will be assigned pre-readings and videos to watch prior to each session. During the online session there will be a lecture that elaborates on key themes, followed by a presentation of the Case Study, and an open discussion among presenters and participants. Participants are welcome to attend any sub-set of sessions; those who complete all four will be awarded a certificate. The content will subsequently be availed for online self-learning. 

Course Objectives

At the end of this course, participants will: 

  • Explain the evolution of COVID-19 and other pandemics and epidemics and the role of leadership, policy makers and implementers in effective systems readiness.
  • Evaluate essential practices to address domestic and global epidemics and pandemics. 
  • Be able to assess, critique and improve the existing tools and resources for effective implementation of COVID-19 response. 
  • Compare the dimensions of public health response to COVID-19 and other epidemics. 
  • Analyze strategies to integrate health equity as a central principle to the success in overcoming COVID-19 and threats of other infectious diseases outbreaks.
  • Share and discuss preliminary lessons on effective design and implementation of COVID-19 interventions.
  • Recognize the important contribution the community plays in slowing down the spread of the infectious disease.

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INSTRUCTORS

Course Directors

Anatole Manzi, PhD, MPhil, MSPH

Phaedra Henley, PhD, MSc

Course Faculty

Abebe Bekele, MD, FCS
Agnes Binagwaho, MD, M(Ped), PhD
Cate Oswald, MPH 
Emily Wroe, MD, MPH   
Jean Baptiste Mazarati, PhD
Jill Moses, MD, MPH      
Joel Mubiligi, MD, MBA 
John Welch, DNP 
Joia Mukherjee, MD, MPH 
Katie Bollbach, MPH, MPA 
Patrick Ulysse MD,MPH
Paul Farmer, MD, PhD 
Paul Sonenthal, MD  
Regan Marsh, MD, MPH  
Sabin Nsanzimana, MD, PhD 
Shada Rouhani, MD, MPH 
Sheila Davis, DNP
Sonya Shin, MD, MPH 
Tharcisse Mpunga, MD, PhD 

Course Schedule

 

Date Time Titles  Faculty & expert panelists
July 7 7:00 – 8:30 AM (PT)

10:00 – 11:30 AM (EDT)

4:00 – 5:30 PM (CAT)

 

A Global Overview & Evolution of COVID-19 Inaugural keynote:

Dr Sheila Davis 

Case presentation: 

Prof. Paul Farmer 

Dr. Joia Mukherjee

Expert speakers: 

Prof. Agnes Binagwaho 

Prof. Abebe Bekele 

Discussant: 

Dr. Joia Mukherjee 

July 9 7:00 – 8:30 AM (PT)

10:00 – 11:30 AM (EDT)

4:00 – 5:30 PM (CAT)

 

Integrated and human-centered Contact Tracing Model: Lessons from Massachusetts, US. Case presentation: 

Dr. John Welch

Dr. Emily Wroe 

Guest speakers:  

Dr Shada Rouhani

Dr. Paul Sonenthal

Discussant: 

Dr. Joia Mukherjee

 

July 14 7:00 – 8:30 AM (PT)

10:00 – 11:30 AM (EDT)

4:00 – 5:30 PM (CAT)

 

COVID-19 & Health Equity: Perspectives of Frontline Implementers  Case presentation: 

Dr. Sonya Shin 

            Dr. Jill Moses    

Guest speakers: 

Dr Patrick Ulysse 

Katie Bollbach 

Dr Regan Marsh

Discussant: 

Cate Oswald 

July 16 7:00 – 8:30 AM (PT)

10:00 – 11:30 AM (EDT)

4:00 – 5:30 PM (CAT)

 

Equity & Innovation: The Response to COVID-19 in Rwanda  Introduction: 

Prof. Agnes Binagwaho 

Case presentation: 

Dr. Sabin Nsanzimana

Guest speakers:

Dr. Jean Baptiste Mazarati 

Hon. Dr. Tharcisse Mpunga

Dr. Joel Mubiligi

Discussant: 

Prof. Agnes Binagwaho

11:30am-12:45pm EDT Graduation session  Closing remarks:

Ophelia Dahl 

Dr. Sheila Davis

Prof. Paul Farmer 

Prof. Agnes Binagwaho

OFFICE HOURS

30min – 1 hour afterward

 

SESSION 1: THE 21ST CENTURY PANDEMIC: COVID-19 AND HEALTH EQUITY

Date

Tuesday, July 7

Instructors: Prof. Paul Farmer, Prof. Agnes Binagwaho, Dr. Sheila Davis, Prof. Abebe Bekele Dr. Joia Mukherjee

This session will provide a global overview of major forces that have shaped the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants will review the global burden of SARS-CoV-2; its epidemiology; and the historic legacy of global pandemic preparedness and response systems. Building on both evidence-based models and lived experience, faculty will lead a reflection journey on our recent shared history with COVID-19.  While efforts are still underway to understand all aspects of the pandemic, this session previews social-economic impact, domestic and global health solidarity and its challenges, and the role of bilateral and multilateral organizations. Participants will also explore ups and downs of global health diplomacy and major strategies for effective pandemic preparedness and response, and health systems recovery.

Learning Objectives:

  • Review the origin, evolution, and early warning indicators of COVID-19 and global inequity 
  • Understand the legacy of inequity within and among countries past pandemics 
  • Discuss leadership dimensions for effective preparedness and response to Covid-19 and other pandemics
  • Understand the relationship of clinical care, social support and public health in pandemic preparation and response
  • Understand basic principles for developing and sustaining an equitable and effective pandemic response.

 

SESSION 2: CONTACT TRACING AND EQUITY: THE ROLE OF WRAP-AROUND SUPPORT IN MASSACHUSETTS

Date

Thursday, July 9th

Instructors: Dr. Joia Mukherjee, Dr. Shada Rouhani, Dr. Paul Sonenthal, Dr. John Welch, Dr. Emily Wroe 

As of June 17, 2020, the United States reported the largest number of COVID-19 cases and deaths with over 2 million and 115 980, respectively. All states’ public health departments have invested significant resources to tackle Covid-19 since the first case was confirmed on Jan. 21, 2020. Social distancing, testing, contact tracing, and treatment have been adopted as means to stop the spread of the virus and minimize its case fatality rate. However, the design and package of Covid-19 responses vary from state to state. In Massachusetts, the Department of Public Health established a collaboration with Partners In Health to launch the Community Tracing Collaborative (CTC) to support the implementation of contact tracing by local boards of health. The CTC focuses on reaching out to the contacts of confirmed positive COVID-19 patients to ensure they have the support they need to self-isolate, and to help protect others who have been potentially exposed to the virus. Key to this effort has been the mounting of a new cadre of Care Resource Coordinators, helping to provide wrap-around services to the most vulnerable people. This session brings senior technical advisors of the Massachusetts response to share best practices and preliminary lessons. Beyond epidemiological surveillance, the faculty and expert panelists will highlight human-centered approaches to tackle Covid-19 and other pandemics.

Learning Objectives:

  • Review the pillars of effective contact tracing and understand the importance of wrap-around supports
  • Understand the role of public health leaders in planning pandemic response founded in equity
  • Discuss preliminary lessons, successes and challenges of Covid-19 contact tracing
  • Understand the types of social support needed for safe and effective isolation and quarantine
  • Describe clinical care referral pathways for contact tracing and their role in promoting equity

 

SESSION 3: COVID-19 & HEALTH EQUITY: PERSPECTIVES OF FRONTLINE IMPLEMENTERS IN THE UNITED STATES AND THE NAVAJO NATION

Date

Tuesday, July 14

Instructors: Dr. Regan Marsh, Dr. Sonya Shin, Katie Bollback, Dr. Patrick Ulysse, Cate Oswald, Dr. Jill Moses

In Session 3, participants will review and discuss equity dimensions and integration for effective public health responses to Covid-19 and other pandemics, with a focus on inequity and racism in the United States. Frontline implementers, public health leaders, policy makers, and other stakeholders involved with COVID-19 response will share their insights on the impacts of inequity and racism on pandemic response. This session includes a thorough review of equity as a core determinant of public health outcomes. As such, participants will examine the role of policy development and advocacy as a means to address health systems gaps. Based on a practical case study of the Navajo Nation in the U.S, our faculty and expert panelists will discuss equity integration as a core strategy to tackle Covid-19 and build sustainable systemic changes. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Review the current state of equity and its implications on public health response to Covid-19 in the U.S.
  • Discuss a potential theory of change to strengthen health equity integration in the US and globally 
  • Understand the impacts of history and COVID-19 on the Navajo Nation, and the ways in which the Nation has organized itself to protect its people and combat the pandemic 
  • Describe and discuss the role of public health implementers, policy makers, and civil society 
  • Understand the roles and responsibilities of current and future leaders in eliminating social disparities in the context of pandemic preparedness and response

 

SESSION 4:  EQUITY & INNOVATION: THE RESPONSE TO COVID-19 IN RWANDA 

Date

Thursday, July 16

Instructors: Prof. Agnes Binagwaho, Hon. Minister of State Tharcisse Mpunga, Dr. Sabin Nsanzimana, Dr. Jean Baptiste Mazarati, Dr. Joel Mubiligi

In Session 4, participants will be guided through the response to COVID-19 in Rwanda, including the important measures the country enacted both before and after the first case of COVID-19. On March 14, 2020, when the first case of COVID-19 was reported, Rwanda rapidly went into full lock-down including immediately implementing quarantine measures and systematic contact tracing, and a week later halted air travel and closing borders. Despite threats from adjacent countries and the added risks of wide-reaching effects such as increased food insecurity and poverty, Rwanda is emerging as a leader in its response to COVID-19 globally, particularly in a low-resource setting. Success has come from strong and decisive leadership; decentralization of care; implementation of evidence-based interventions; innovations such as the use of drones to continue drug delivery; the local development of ventilators; social mobilization to support the poor, and strong South-to-South collaboration. Government institutions and the response team instantaneously reacted to the pandemic with the overall goal of containing COVID-19 while ensuring the well-being of Rwandan residents including the most vulnerable. 

Learning Objectives

  • Illustrate the critical importance of interdisciplinary collaboration and coordination to address problems in global health delivery
  • Discuss how Rwanda used community education to contain COVID-19
  • Critically evaluate the challenges facing low-resource settings during the pandemic and after it through an equity lens
  • Discuss the significance of data-driven decision-making and response
  • Investigate the strategic investments needed to continue care
  • Recognize the importance of social mobilization to support the marginalized 
  • Evaluate the Government of Rwanda’s response to emerging infectious diseases